Monthly Archives: August 2013

P.S. Equals Preservation Society by Violet Faigan

When The Modern Miss closed down, we were intrigued to read Violet Faigan’s cryptic clue on Facebook, ‘P.S’. Now we all know what that meant – Preservation Society. Last night was its eagerly anticipated opening at 21 Moray Place. Violet’s sleek and spacious new shop is a mixture of what Violet knows best, carefully selected vintage clothing, and her own range of jewellery, Prince of Butchers. The opening was a photographer’s dream – so many elegantly dressed people having a great time.

Violet Faigan and her family. From left: Violet, Clara, Malcolm, Emerald.

Violet Faigan and her family. From left: Violet, Clara, Malcolm, Emerald.

Kelly serves bubbles.

Kelly serves bubbles.

Debbie from Purple Rain

Debbie from Purple Rain

Michael, Judy and Saskia

Michael, Judy and Saskia

Lucinda on the mezzanine floor

Lucinda on the mezzanine floor

Prince of Butchers jewellery by Violet Faigan

Prince of Butchers jewellery by Violet Faigan

Judy and Gilbert

Judy and Gilbert

Kerry Ann and Sally

Kerry Ann and Sally

Tannia from Most Wanted Vintage

Tannia from Most Wanted Vintage

Vanessa and Elisha

Vanessa and Elisha

Deirdre and Elena from Atelier Jeux d'esprit

Deirdre and Elena from Atelier Jeux d’esprit

Ruby and Hannah

Ruby and Hannah

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Wesley Wears Where?

When Wesley Fourie moved from Auckland to Dunedin about a year ago, he single handedly upped the standard of local male fashion. Wesley, originally from South Africa, was first captured on camera by us at the opening of the Company of Strangers store in February. We were blown away by his style and have enjoyed following him round to snap more of it. He is passionate about supporting local designers. But, you’ll also find the occasional piece by overseas designers such as Martin Margiela or Ann Demeulemeester creeping into his wardrobe. He also owns bespoke pieces by Otago Polytechnic fashion graduate, Sam Ralph. Wesley works part time at Sliver so his hair looks as good as the rest of him. Wesley, you are a Dunners’ stunner and a great ambassador for our local fashion industry.

 

Tuesday – on the way to work

Sweater and jacket by World, sample baggies by Zambesi, bag by Company of Strangers, shoes by Phillip James Frost x Company of Strangers Converse, and beanie by Strangelove from Company of Strangers.

Sweater and jacket by World, sample baggies by Zambesi, bag by Company of Strangers, shoes by Phillip James Frost x Company of Strangers Converse, and beanie by Strangelove from Company of Strangers.

Rings by Company of Strangers

Rings by Company of Strangers

Bag by Company of Strangers

Bag by Company of Strangers

 

Wednesday – window shopping at Portil Music Store

Under jacket, dresses (two), shorts and socks by NOM*d. Leather jacket by Maison Martin Margiela, and Doc Martens.

Under jacket, dresses (two), shorts and socks by NOM*d. Leather jacket by Maison Martin Margiela, and Doc Martens.

Bag by Company of Strangers

Bag by Company of Strangers

 

NOM*d bonanza with Doc Martens

NOM*d bonanza with Doc Martens

 

Thursday – working in Sliver

Jacket by Ann Demeulemeester. Tee and overlanders by NOM*d.

Jacket by Ann Demeulemeester. Tee and overlanders by NOM*d.

 

Friday – graffiti art exploration

Cardigan, skirt and shirt jacket by NOM*d. Dress and pants by Lela Jacobs. Sash by Damir Doma.

Cardigan, skirt and shirt jacket by NOM*d. Dress and pants by Lela Jacobs. Sash by Damir Doma.

Bag by Company of Strangers

Bag by Company of Strangers

Poster tee by NOM*d

Poster tee by NOM*d

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We Love ‘Delicacy by Alison Lambert’

If you enjoy food that is fresh, local, seasonal and organic then you really should take a trip up the hill to our favourite cafe, Delicacy by Alison Lambert (595 Highgate, Maori Hill). The food is all of these things but more. It’s artistically presented and the combinations of flavours are creative. Last but not least, it tastes damn good. Alison has recently taken over and transformed Delicacy with the help of her great team, including husband Simon. 

The delicious tart and salads (including Nanda's noodle salad) which change daily

The delicious tart and salads (including Nanda’s noodle salad) which change daily

We are addicted to Delicacy's slices and cakes

We are addicted to Delicacy’s slices and cakes

What we had for lunch

What we had for lunch

Delicacy by Alison Lambert

Delicacy by Alison Lambert

Alison has passion, enthusiasm and dedication for what she does, with a good dose of girl power thrown in. Her life story is one of the most interesting you’ll ever hear. Food runs in the family. Alison grew up, in Dunedin, eating food grown by her father and cooked by her mother. She learnt her first baking skills in the family kitchen. Her love of food was evident from the moment she could talk, even turning a doll’s house into a restaurant.

Naturally, Alison trained as a chef after leaving school and headed overseas. Arriving in London, she applied for jobs in the top ten restaurants and was offered all of them. She worked in Aubergine (with Gordon Ramsay) as well as The Ivy. She found her niche when she discovered The River Cafe via their first cookbook and they offered her a job. There, she worked alongside Jamie Oliver and Hugh Fearnley-Whittingstall (River Cottage). She was involved with River Cafe Cook Book Two.

Alison and some of her great team at work. The open kitchen is reminiscent of The River Cafe which pioneered this style.

Alison and some of her great team at work. The open kitchen is reminiscent of The River Cafe which pioneered this style.

From there, Alison spent some time travelling around Europe. This included running a taverna in Greece, one of her favourite countries. She learnt a lot about local produce and ingredients from living in a small Greek village. Lucky for us, family ties and expecting her third child brought her home to Dunedin.

Since then, Alison has been on a mission to encourage us all to get back in the kitchen with her simple unpretentious food ideas. She is hugely involved with the highly successful Otago Farmers Market, where you will always find her cooking up a storm in the mobile kitchen/caravan. Each week, Alison demonstrates how to make four different delicious dishes, showcasing local producers. She had already proved her cooking capabilities in the caravan by planning and presenting menus for students on a budget for Orientation Week in 2010. She continues to be involved with O Week.

Alison in the Otago Farmers Market mobile kitchen

Alison in the Otago Farmers Market mobile kitchen

Alison preparing some delicious warming oats

Alison preparing some delicious warming oats

Alison is also involved with the Community Garden project in South Dunedin where unused/donated land is being turned into a productive garden to help troubled youth in the area. 

If all of this isn’t enough, she also runs a Food Club with themed demonstrations. Her next goal is to produce her own cookbook. Alison, we don’t know how you do it! You are an inspiration.

Alison in 'Delicacy by Alison Lambert'

Alison in ‘Delicacy by Alison Lambert’

You can follow Alison’s food exploits on her blog, ‘Taste of My Life’.

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Claim to Fame on Campus: Deborah Lambie

Deborah’s a very busy lady. She’s in the 4th year of her medical degree at the University of Otago. Last year, she took time out from her practical training to focus on research and managed to complete both a Master of Entrepreneurship with Distinction and a Bachelor of Medical Sciences with First Class Honours! Her thesis was in bioethics. But there’s more! Deb is also likely to turn heads on the street, and not because she’s wearing her doctor’s coat and stethoscope!

Medical School

Trophies awarded to Deb for national public speaking competitions through Toastmasters

Trophies awarded to Deb for national public speaking competitions through Toastmasters

A couple of years ago, Deb was scouted by a leading local modelling agency and found herself on the Railway Station catwalk modelling at iD Dunedin Fashion Week. She found this modelling experience very helpful for what was to come. Deb is now one of only 20 finalists in the 2013 Miss Universe New Zealand Competition and she’s keen to break the stereotype!

Deborah Lambie

We called in to have a chat with Deb about the competition. She reflected on her journey.

When I first watched Miss New Zealand, I thought, wow, I could never do that! But others have believed in me, encouraged me and helped me develop my skillset and now, years later, I am a contestant. I want to encourage young people to strive to achieve their best in any avenue they choose to apply themselves.”

There’s more to the competition than meets the eye. In a week’s time, she will be attending an international retreat with the other finalists at a mystery location.

In keeping with Dunedin Wears The Pants, we were keen to find out more about her style. She describes it as classy, feminine and sophisticated.

Deb's wardrobe

Deb’s wardrobe

Most of Deb’s clothes come from Refined Rig, where Sun Dean (the talented owner and stylist) has been very supportive in helping Deb prepare for the competition. Deb also enjoys shopping at Ruby, Deval Boutique and Void. When asked if she had any role models, she replied without hesitation that it was Olivia Culpo, Miss Universe 2012, who also happens to be a university student. “She’s so real and so positive – such a lovely, bubbly personality.”

One of Deb's favourite outfits from Refined Rig

One of Deb’s favourite outfits from Refined Rig

Deb’s a great example of giving-it-a-go Dunedin spirit. We wish her loads of luck!

Deb wears jacket from Refined Rig

Deb wears jacket from Refined Rig

You can vote for Deb by liking her official Facebook page where details of how to vote by text will then appear.

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Senorita AweSUMO Flies the Flag for Dunedin Eco Fashion

Recycling has been a hot topic in the media lately. For Fiona Clements, designer of the eco fashion label Senorita AweSUMO, it’s a way of life. As we blog, she is busy preparing for NZ Eco Fashion Week in Lower Hutt next month. She still found time to talk to us about her aesthetic and what she likes about Dunedin.

You grew up in Waitati, on the outskirts of Dunedin. Tell us about your upbringing. 

I grew up outside, playing at the beach, having adventures, cooking on hobo stoves, making huts and staying out all day. Surrounded by nature, barefoot, sun-filled days, Mum’s veggie garden, home preserves, baking and chickens. Waitati is a great community and my best friend (11 days older than me) lived just through the neighbours’ paddock up the back.

How did this environment influence what you do?

The environment has influenced me because I am a creature of the earth and need to be closely connected to it. I love textures, ripples in the sand, clouds, colours of the sunset. I know that being close to the earth is better. I prefer organic, sustainable living. I’m a very sensitive person; my body reacts badly to toxins and I believe that what you have and are as a being should always be honest to yourself and earth alike.

What prompted you to become an eco-fashion designer?

I got sick from working in the sign-writing/graphic design industry. I lived in the realm of Headachia for 6 months, then got fired. I knew I needed to change my life for the better so I moved back home with my parents as I was too ill to look after myself. I entered Novadown Fashioned Feathers competition and won in 2008 with my entry ButterFly Free. This made me realise I could do the polytech course and applied. I never thought I’d graduate from something like that. I’m happy I proved myself wrong.

Do you have any qualifications in fashion design?

I have a Bachelor of Design (Fashion) from the Otago Polytechnic (passed with merit) in 2011.

Many renowned fashion designers leave garment construction to others. Are you handy with a sewing machine and if so, where/when did you learn your skills?

Handy with a sewing machine is an understatement. I’m a third generation Dunedin sewer! I have a very close relationship with my machines. It’s necessary as the way I design and make my garments is very different to ‘normal’ fashion designers. I have to know the capabilities of my machines so I can push the boundaries. I learnt to sew from my family; my maternal grandmother was a tailoress and had a shop in North East Valley, Dunedin. I still treasure her sewing things and use them daily. As a child, my mother made most of my clothes.

2012 iD Dunedin Fashion Week. Photo courtesy of Chris Sullivan/Seen in Dunedin.

Tell us about your ‘Te Warewhare Whakapau’ collection.

‘Te Warewhare Whakapau’ is a collection of pieces to show consumers that the waste they throw away is still beautiful and useful. It highlights that the other side of ‘quick turn around fashion’ means that people throw away beautiful useful things in pursuit of the next new thing. This collection is your waste, DUNEDIN!

You find your recycled materials in landfills and op shops. How much time do you spend looking for materials?

Currently, I’m not spending a lot of time searching for materials; I’m still working my way through bags I’ve collected over the last 2 years from commercial places. Ideally, I’d like to be collecting from recycling centres weekly, but am only managing monthly visits at present because of storage space constraints. I can only do so much; I’m only one person!

Do you have something in mind when you are searching or do the materials you find decide the direction you are going to take?

I keep an open mind when searching; you never know what will jump out and hit you in the face! People throw out some pretty amazing trash, and I have a vivid imagination!!!

You are showing your collection at New Zealand’s first National Eco Fashion Runway Event at The Notre Dame des Missions Arts Centre at Sacred Heart College in Lower Hutt. How did you get involved with this?

I found the event online while searching for New Zealand eco fashion. I researched the concept and the person behind it and decided to get involved. We need to build a collective to move forward. It’s a great opportunity. I am now linked nationally with other people, all of us doing the same thing.

Tell us what you expect to happen at the event.

The runway show will be in the evening. During the day there will be show rehearsals and a shwop and style event. It’s like a shop where you swap clothes and get styled at the same time – a great opportunity to meet new people and see new looks! I’m really looking forward to meeting some faces behind names at the inaugural designer dinner on the Friday night.

You showed a collection at iD Dunedin Fashion Week in 2012. Do you hope to show there again in the future?

If I can get some funding to show, I’d love to for sure. It would be amazing if they included a sustainable eco section at iD Dunedin Fashion Week, to better highlight some of New Zealand and Dunedin’s great eco talent.

Where can we find your clothes in Dunedin?

My clothes are in The Cuckoo’s Nest Ethical Boutique. Most months I’m at Market 22 on Vogel Street. I’m working on my website. I’m on Facebook, and I write a blog. I’m also looking into finding some studio space in town, so watch this space!!!

The retail industry is changing rapidly with an increasing presence online. Do you intend to start an online shop?

I’m in the process of setting that up. The internet is the only way to go now!

Where do you see Senorita AweSUMO in 5 years time?

Future Senorita AweSUMO will be epic. It will have employees and be collecting fabric waste from suppliers regularly, creating clothing in a more holistic manner and creating a closer relationship between designer, process, machine and consumer to eliminate waste.

Are there any particular national or international eco designers or advocates you admire and why?

Orsola de Castro, Timo Rissanen, Holly McQuillan, Julian Roberts, Alexander McQueen, Gary Harvey. I heart all of these people; they are amazeballs!! Total inspiration and hope givers.

You now live in Port Chalmers. What made you choose to live there?

Port Chalmers is ace! After living in Waitati with no supermarket and no pub, I’m living the high life now. Yehaa!!

 

Fiona Clements in the 2012 iD Dunedin Fashion Show Finale. Photo courtesy of Chris Sullivan/Seen in Dunedin.

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A Very Foxy Party: Purple Rain Retro Cafe, 10 August

What happens when you mix Quick Brown Fox and Purple Rain? You get a fabulous foxy party! One of us spent last Saturday night sampling Arjun Haszard’s Quick Brown Fox and Lazy Dog coffee liqueurs in the Purple Rain boudoir while listening to smooth jazz. It’s a hard life!

Quick Brown Fox is no ordinary coffee liqueur. Using a unique cold extraction method, Arjun has put a lot of time and thought into creating this tantalizing and thirst-quenching liqueur for us to enjoy. He works alongside The Strictly Coffee Company where the beans are roasted. Since its inception in December 2011, Quick Brown Fox has won a bronze award at the International Wine and Spirit Competition and has really taken off. For those of you who prefer a decaf alternative, Arjun has created Lazy Dog.

Debbie prepares a Foxy Russian

Debbie prepares a Foxy Russian

Arjun offers a taste of Ocho chocolate

Arjun offers a taste of Ocho chocolate

The Purple Rain team laid on a scrumptious feast of hedgehogs, falafel, mini quiches, curried egg, vege platters, dutch doughnuts, you name it!

It brought back fond memories of our own retro party several months back. Jazz-goers looked sophisticated and suave, yet the atmosphere was cheerful and inclusive, a great event for making new friends.

Frits and friend

Frits and friend

Chris Butchard

Chris Butchard

Hana Fahy

Hana Fahy

Sharon and Sanae. Sharon wears dress from the Vintage Dress Company. Sanae wears dress by Charmaine Reveley.

Sharon and Sanae. Sharon wears dress from the Vintage Dress Company. Sanae wears dress by Charmaine Reveley.

Kat and Sarah

Kat and Sarah

Kylie and Richard. Richard wears suit from Hallensteins.

Kylie and Richard. Richard wears suit from Hallensteins.

Lesley (Dunedin perfumier)

Lesley (Dunedin perfumier)

Tara and Naomi wear clothing from Toffs

Lucy and Will. Lucy wears top from Toffs. Will wears tee from SaveMart.

Lucy and Will. Lucy wears top from Toffs. Will wears tee from SaveMart.

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On The Porch With Operation Underground, 4 August

On the 3rd of July, Operation Underground, under the musical directorship of Michael Morris, was launched at Queens Bar. The aim was to raise enough money for a group of New Zealand indie musicians to come together and produce their own CD. By the 9th of July, the $5000 needed to ensure the project went ahead was pledged. Michael and his team are stoked by the local support which has enabled Operation Underground to move ahead. Since then, they have been busy recording and filming the artists from Michael’s own Dunedin porch! One of us went along to enjoy the spectacle on a sunny Dunedin Sunday, eagerly anticipating who would play. It turned out to be Nannystate! They performed two songs: ‘Wicked World To Waste’ and ‘Walnuts and Honey’. The band’s beautiful vocal harmonies, frequent time changes and poignant violin are some of the features that give Nannystate a wonderfully original sound.

Setting up on the porch with the help of Michael Morris (right)

Setting up on the porch with the help of Michael Morris (right)

Tuning time

Tuning time

Nannystate

Nannystate

Nannystate - pleased with how the porch session went (from left: Alex Vaatstra, Kate Brown, Robin Cederman and Tim Cederman)

Nannystate – pleased with how the porch session went (from left: Alex Vaatstra, Kate Brown, Robin Cederman and Tim Cederman)

Have a listen to their porch session of ‘Wicked World To Waste’ here.

After the porch sessions have all been recorded, Michael Morris will be on the road with The River Jesters, a psychedelic folk duo comprising himself and Tom Batchelor from The X Factor!

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Dunedin Through the Lens of Alan Haig Photography

You won’t find anyone who embodies the spirit of Dunedin more than Alan Haig. Dunedin born and bred, Alan has been a major contributor to the local music scene for decades, having played in iconic Dunedin Sound bands such as The Chills and, more recently, David Kilgour and The Heavy Eights. He has now turned his considerable talents to photography. We asked Alan a few questions about his latest endeavour.

What prompted you to move your focus from music to photography?

I have been a musician for the last 30 years starting in the early eighties which is now known for the ‘Dunedin Sound’. I contribute my original ideas to assist the others to get a musical piece finished. I always have a picture in my mind while performing musically. This combination makes me who I am. These days I have been giving live music a break but am experimenting with sounds at home. It now gives me the time to focus on my photography hobby. I do like the idea of combining my still imagery with my own musical soundtracks, a long term goal.

The vibrant Port Chalmers and Portobello communities

The vibrant Port Chalmers and Portobello communities

Low tide in Portobello

Low tide in Portobello

How long have you been working as a photographer professionally?

It would be nice to become a professional photographer but at this stage it remains as a hobby. With the help of Sam Clarkson of Clarkson Design, I set up my photography website initially to get my images out for public viewing and feedback. I’m keen to establish myself professionally and welcome any enquiries about commissions.

Broad Bay

Broad Bay

Hoopers Inlet, Otago Peninsula

Hoopers Inlet, Otago Peninsula

What is your preferred subject matter?

I love landscapes and as I gain more experience new ideas evolve.

Black & White images are a favourite and enforce the basic rules of actual film photography. Colour does have a lot of distractions but does have its place. Street/Urban is another area which I enjoy. All these descriptions tend to cross over in subject material so I just go with what the image means and categorise it accordingly.

The Sound Shell, Dunedin Botanic Garden

The Sound Shell, Dunedin Botanic Garden

The Quad, University of Otago

The Quad, University of Otago

Are there any New Zealand or overseas photographers who influence your work?

I look at what other photographers are doing from the likes of Facebook and various photo websites. There are some great ones out there. Locals such as Ian Bilson, Alistair Reid and Chris Reid are long-term friends and mentors and I admire their work. I subscribe to the British magazine Black & White Photography which is full of inspirational articles and examples of fine images. Lee Frost and Tim Clinch, both professional, produce some great work which I aspire to and they write excellent articles in this magazine.

A historical building in Dunedin's First Church grounds

A historical building in Dunedin’s First Church grounds

The 'Nigel Bruce' Steam Train at the Dunedin Railway Station

The ‘Nigel Bruce’ Steam Train at the Dunedin Railway Station

You use a wide variety of techniques in your photographs. Are these techniques easy to achieve?

I experiment with different darkroom techniques digitally these days. It’s amazing how one single image can be manipulated in many different ways. Thankfully I have had some experience in the ‘real darkroom’ and shooting with film to have a reasonable amount of knowledge to apply to post production.

I print my images using Ilford ink jet papers. It’s personally satisfying having the final control in producing the idea. Printing digitally requires some dedication but is worth it at the end.

I can imagine the huge number of great photos taken by others that are locked up in a hard drive to be viewed only a few times and forgotten.

Ilford has just produced a dedicated Black & White ink jet paper called Mono Silk, which is stunning. I have started using this and it is producing some excellent results.

Steam train activity at the Dunedin Railway Station

Steam train activity at the Dunedin Railway Station

The vacant Gresham Hotel

The vacant Gresham Hotel

Alan Haig

Alan Haig

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What Are You Wearing August I?

Who said Dunedinites only wear black? There’s plenty of colour here!

Abby wears coat by Glassons.

Abby wears coat by Glassons.

Hamish and Kim wear op-shop and online.

Hamish and Kim wear op-shop and online.

Olivia wears op-shop.

Olivia wears op-shop.

Chloe wears vintage.

Chloe wears vintage.

Dorian wears shirt by Moodie Tuesday and pants by Barkers.

Dorian wears shirt by Moodie Tuesday and pants by Barkers.

Sam wears op-shop and vintage.

Sam wears op-shop and vintage.

Hine wears coat from the OUSA market, vest from The Modern Miss and skirt by Glassons.

Hine wears coat from the OUSA market, vest from The Modern Miss and skirt by Glassons.

Holly (from England) wears necklace by Vivienne Westwood from the V&A, coat by Karen Millen and jeans by Storm.

Holly (from England) wears necklace by Vivienne Westwood from the V&A, coat by Karen Millen and jeans by Storm.

 

NB: Sorry if we’ve spelt anyone’s name wrong. Please let us know and we will correct it.

 

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